According to Reuters, a French naval contractor DCNS said on Wednesday it may have been the victim of “economic warfare” after secrets about its Scorpene submarines being built in India were leaked. If this was economic warfare as speculated, we can expect more attacks like this on a global scale. Hacktivists are motivated by reputational, economic and political gains from capitalizing on businesses’ and countries’ inability to secure sensitive, critical documents— tipping the scale in favor of other contenders in future military action and contracting situations. Sharing files, such as the 22,000+ pages of blueprints and technical details on DCNS’s Scorpene submarines, is a necessary collaboration between government, contractor and manufacturing entities. But the exposure of these Indian naval secrets illustrates how lax file protection has opened a door to new data loss risks—and how even confidential military information can be exfiltrated and exposed by a weak link in the supply chain. File security controls, such as encryption, access and digital rights management available from FinalCode and other infosec vendors, should have been persistently applied to these files and according to policy, in order to mitigate these costly risks.